"I think there is beauty in everything. What 'normal' people perceive as ugly, I can usually see something of beauty in it."—Alexander McQueen

"I think there is beauty in everything. What 'normal' people perceive as ugly, I can usually see something of beauty in it."—Alexander McQueen

house roof

Is Shingle Roofing Good for Hot Climates?

When it comes to roofing material, shingles remain to be the most popular choice of Americans. It’s affordable, easy to install, not to mention highly visually pleasing. There are also many types of shingles to choose from, so buyers aren’t limited to a single look that’s identical with everybody else’s.

But with the summer approaching, you may wonder if a shingle is still the most practical choice. Asphalt shingles, the most popular and affordable type of shingle, are known to absorb a lot of heat that can stream into the interiors of your home. Considering that, it seems sensible to omit asphalt shingles out of your options, especially if you’re cutting down on energy bills.

But if you’re really set on having shingle roofing for your new home, the key is to select a type that has excellent insulation. Reliable roofing contractors from Orlando or any area near your residence can help you decide on the best shingles.

That said, let’s go over the types of shingle roofing that perform well with heat:

1. Metal Roof Shingles

If your home’s structure is unable to support heavyweight roofing, metal roof shingles are what you should opt for. They’re lightweight, easy to install, and timelessly appealing. They also have an impressive lifespan, lasting for 75 up to 100 years. Furthermore, they’re known as a “cool roofing” material, performing excellently at keeping your home cool in the summer.

Metal shingles come in aluminum, steel, copper, and alloy strips, all in various shapes and textures. Copper, in particular, is on the pricier side, and it develops a greenish patina over time, which some buyers may or may not find appealing. Metal shingle costs are typically between $850 – $1,140 per square.

2. Slate Roof Tile

On the other hand, if your home’s structure is tough enough to support heavy roofing, you may consider slate roof tile. They’re made of stone, making them completely weather-proof, no matter the climate. For that reason, slate tiles have the longest lifespan out of all shingle types, lasting up to 150 years or more.

Take note that before having slate roof tiles installed, you need to have your home’s structure professionally assessed to verify that it can indeed support the roofing’s weight, which ranges from 800 – 1,500 lbs. per square. As for the costs, they typically range from $800 – $1,400 per square.

3. Clay Roof Shingles

Roof installation

If you’re building a rustic-style home, clay roof shingles will be the most suitable for that. They’re thermal resistant and available in earthen colors that’s exactly what a rustic home calls for. They’re also a natural material like slate, but on top of that, they’re eco-friendly and recyclable.

A professional assessment of your home’s structure is also required before having clay shingles installed, as they’re another heavyweight material. They’re a worthy investment, though, as clay shingles can last up to a hundred years, and are relatively less expensive than metal and slate, costing only $100 – $1,800 per square.

4. Rubber Roof Shingles

If you’re looking for a more affordable alternative for slate, consider rubber roof shingles. The material mimics the look of asphalt, slate, and cedar (another classic shingle choice). Rubber roof shingles are eco-friendly, too, being made of recycled materials.

They’re also energy-efficient, given rubber’s excellent insulation capabilities. Costs are generally only between $400- $825 per square, making rubber shingles the most budget-friendly option. However, its lifespan is far shorter compared to the 3 other types, lasting only 15 – 25 years.

With these four best shingle types explained, we just gathered that it’s entirely possible for shingles to withstand the summer heat, as long as you keep your options to these materials. What’s more, having an energy-efficient roofing material may grant you tax credits, so check out your local or federal rebate programs before making your choice.

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Scroll to Top